XXVIII Encuentros de Residentes de Medicina y Enfermería Familiar y Comunitaria de Asturias 2020 | Music Makes Me Feel Good
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Music Makes Me Feel Good

How did they balance being so funny and being such respected artists?” This question was recently posed by a visitor in reference to Peter Fischli David Weiss: How to Work Better, a retrospective of the Swiss duo’s thirty-three-year collaborative career currently on view at the Guggenheim. The visitor’s question prompted by Suddenly This Overview (1981–), a series of clay sculptures that form a tongue-in-cheek index of human history—gets to the heart of the duo’s artistic and philosophical investigation of what they called “popular opposites.” The term refers to the supposedly inherent dichotomies we draw between things such as art and kitsch, work and leisure, and other such dualities. How to Work Better, a retrospective of the Swiss duo’s thirty-three-year collaborative career currently on view at the Guggenheim. The visitor’s question prompted by Suddenly This Overview (1981–), a series of clay sculptures that form a tongue-in-cheek index of human history—gets to the heart of the duo’s artistic and philosophical investigation of what they called “popular opposites.” The term refers to the supposedly inherent dichotomies we draw between things such as art and kitsch, work and leisure, and other such dualities.

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How to Work Better, a retrospective of the Swiss duo’s thirty-three-year collaborative career currently on view at the Guggenheim. The visitor’s question prompted by Suddenly This Overview (1981–), a series of clay sculptures that form a tongue-in-cheek index of human history—gets to the heart of the duo’s artistic and philosophical investigation of what they called “popular opposites.” The term refers to the supposedly inherent dichotomies we draw between things such as art and kitsch, work and leisure, and other such dualities. How to Work Better, a retrospective of the Swiss duo’s thirty-three-year collaborative career currently on view at the Guggenheim. The visitor’s question prompted by Suddenly This Overview (1981–), a series of clay sculptures that form a tongue-in-cheek index of human history—gets to the heart of the duo’s artistic and philosophical investigation of what they called “popular opposites.” The term refers to the supposedly inherent dichotomies we draw between things such as art and kitsch, work and leisure, and other such dualities.

The term refers to the supposedly inherent dichotomies we draw between things such as art and kitsch, work and leisure, and other such dualities. How to Work Better, a retrospective of the Swiss duo’s thirty-three-year collaborative career currently on view at the Guggenheim. The visitor’s question prompted by Suddenly This Overview (1981–), a series of clay sculptures that form a tongue-in-cheek index of human history.

He gets to the heart of the duo’s artistic and philosophical investigation in art forms, making it memorable.

– Robert Anakis

How to Work Better, a retrospective of the Swiss duo’s thirty-three-year collaborative career currently on view at the Guggenheim. The visitor’s question prompted by Suddenly This Overview (1981–), a series of clay sculptures that form a tongue-in-cheek index of human history—gets to the heart of the duo’s artistic and philosophical investigation of what they called “popular opposites.” The term refers to the supposedly inherent dichotomies we draw between things such as art and kitsch, work and leisure, and other such dualities. How to Work Better, a retrospective of the Swiss duo’s thirty-three-year collaborative career currently on view at the Guggenheim. The visitor’s question prompted by Suddenly This Overview (1981–), a series of clay sculptures that form a tongue-in-cheek index of human history—gets to the heart of the duo’s artistic and philosophical investigation of what they called “popular opposites.” The term refers to the supposedly inherent dichotomies we draw between things such as art and kitsch, work and leisure, and other such dualities.

The term refers to the supposedly inherent dichotomies we draw between things such as art and kitsch, work and leisure, and other such dualities. How to Work Better, a retrospective of the Swiss duo’s thirty-three-year collaborative career currently on view at the Guggenheim. The visitor’s question prompted by Suddenly This Overview (1981–), a series of clay sculptures that form a tongue-in-cheek index of human history.

1 Comment
  • Robert Nordstrom
    Posted at 13:41h, 06 mayo Responder

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